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Ensoft’s software от компании Ensoft, Inc

Автор: Гричуха Константин

Дата: 2018-01-28

Ensoft’s software от компании Ensoft, Inc

http://www.ensoftinc.com/

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Программное обеспечение для инженерных геологов, анализа грунтов и почв, грунтоведение и гидрогеология, бурение, нефть и газ и многое другое...
Ensoft, Inc.,
was established in Austin, Texas in 1985 by Dr. Lymon C. Reese with the principal aim of developing and applying computer-based solutions to complex engineering problems and has since built a strong reputation as a leader in this area. Ensoft has applied advanced technology, much of it based on recent research, in the writing of software for the solution of complex problems that arise in geotechnical and structural engineering. Notable among Ensoft’s computer programs are those that address the analysis and design of foundations employing piles and drilled shafts.

Программное обеспечение:

LPILE
LPILE is a special-purpose and internationally recognized computer program based on rational procedures for analyzing a pile under lateral loading using the p-y method. LPILE solves the differential equation for a beam-column using a finite difference approach. The program computes deflection, bending moment, shear force and soil response over the length of the pile.
Nonlinear lateral load-transfer from the foundation to the soil is modeled using p-y curves generated internally using published recommendations for various types of soils, or user-inputted p-y curves. Specialized procedures are also available for computing p-y curves for layered soils and rocks.
With the first release dating back to 1986, LPILE has continuously been developed and improved to meet user needs and incorporate state-of-the-art literature and procedures.

GROUP is a well-accepted tool for analyzing the behavior of pile groups subjected to both axial and lateral loadings. The program was developed to compute the distribution of loads (vertical, lateral, and overturning moment up to three orthogonal axes) applied from any multiple locations in the pile cap to piles arranged in a group.
The program generates internally the nonlinear response of the soil, in the form of t-z and Q-w curves for axial loading, in the form of p-y curves for lateral loading and in the form of T-q curves for torsional loading. A solution requires iteration to accommodate the nonlinear response of each pile in the group model. Program GROUP solves the nonlinear response of each pile under combined loadings and assures compatibility of deformations and equilibrium of forces between the applied external loads and the reactions of each pile head.

APILE is used to compute the axial capacity, as a function of depth, of a driven pile in clay, sand, or mixed-soil profiles. Following methods are used for computations of pile capacity:
American Petroleum Institute (API RP-2A)
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)
U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)
Revised Lambda Method
The special APILE Offshore version includes four other CPT based methods:
Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (NGI)
Imperial College Pile method (ICP and also referred as the Marine Technology Directorate or MTD method)
University of Western Australia (UWA)
Fugro method

PYWALL
The theoretical concepts used in the PYWALL software extend beyond the conventional method of analysis and design of flexible retaining walls based on limit-equilibrium theory. As a difference to conventional pratice, the PYWALL method includes the effects of soil-structure interaction.
Modern methods of analyses of the behavior of reatining structures consider realistic soil conditions and relevant details of the structural system. Therefore, a rational method of analysis and design must include the nonlinear soil-resistance-displacement relationships, pile spacings, penetration depths and structural properties. PYWALL considers soil-structure interaction by using a beam-column model and can analyze the behavior of a flexible retaining wall or soldier-pile wall with or without tiebacks or bracing systems.

SHAFT
SHAFT is a computer program used to evaluate the axial capacity and the short-term, load-settlement curves of drilled shafts or bored piles in various types of soils. In general, the majority of axial capacity methods used by SHAFT are based on the latest FHWA manual. In addition, several other axial capacity methods are provided for clay shales, gravels, and gravelly sands.
SHAFT can analyze the axial capacity and settlement behavior of drilled-shafts in eight types of soil and rock models. SHAFT can accommodate any combination of soil and rock layers in a layered profile. The soils and rock models in SHAFT are the following:
clay - cohesive geomaterial (FHWA)
sand - cohesionless geomaterial (FHWA)
clay - shale (Reese & Aurora)
strong rock - using either side resistance or end bearing (FHWA)
strong rock - using both side resistance plus end bearing (for comparison)
decomposed rock/gravel (FHWA)
weak rock - cohesive intermediate geomaterial (FHWA)
gravel - cohesionless intermediate geomaterial (Rollins et al)
gravelly sand (Rollins et al)

TZPILE
TZPILE implements the well-known method of soil-structure interaction, commonly called the t-z method, where t-z and Q-w curves are used respectively for load transfers in side resistance and end bearing. The t-z and Q-w curves can be internally-generated for both driven piles and drilled shafts with the input of information on the supporting soil and on the geometry of the pile.
Curves of short-term settlement as a function of applied loads are essential for some engineering computations; for example, when refined input is needed for the analysis of piles in a group. If a field-load test is performed, the computed curves can be "calibrated" by modifying input information to TZPILE to reach agreement with the experimental curves. The calibrated, site-specific curves can then be used with TZPILE to design the production piles, which may vary from the test piles in geometry and stiffness.
The main output provided by TZPILE is pile-head movement as a function of applied load. However, for any given load, the program can also present the load and movement along the length of the pile. In addition, the program allows the user to specify the settlement profile if the user would like to consider negative skin friction caused by downdrag. The program will use iterative solution to find the soil reaction based on the relative movement between the soil and the pile at the depth of interest. The neutral depth, which separates the negative and positive skin frictions, will be generated.

DYNAN
A powerful computer program should be founded on advanced theory and be verified by tests and practice. The DYNAN program follows these guidelines. DYNAN is based on the improved Novak’s method where a non-reflective boundary is formed between the near field and the far field to account for the mass of soil in the boundary. The program yields the dynamic response of both shallow and deep foundations under harmonic, transient, and random loadings. Such loadings can be produced by rotating or reciprocating machines, earthquake, wind, blast, sea waves, and other sources.
The foundations (or caps on piles) are assumed to be rigid, and all six degrees of freedom are considered as coupled. The foundation stiffness and damping constants are also returned for possible use in soil-structure interaction analysis.
The stiffness of the supporting soil along with damping constants needed for the analysis and evaluated in the program for surface foundations, embedded foundations, and pile foundations. Soil layering, a possible weakened zone (see sketch) around a foundation, and pile-soil-pile interaction are all taken into account.
The computational method has been applied to important engineering practice (Han, 1987, and Han, et al, 1999). To investigate soil-structure interaction, a series of dynamic experiments were performed on full-scale mat foundations (Han, 1989) and on full-scale piles (Han and Novak, 1989, 1992). The elastic wave energy from foundation vibration was dissipated in three dimensions as radiation damping. The soil is not a perfect elastic medium as assumed in the theory and the experiments showed that damping is overestimated in the computation. For practical purposes, the damping is reduced in DYNAN based on experimental results.
DYNAN can be used for the dynamic analysis under transient and random loading in the time domain. It also can be used for harmonic loading in the frequency domain. By means of a substructure method, the dynamic response of superstructure is calculated using a finite element program, such as SAP2000, and the stiffness and damping of foundation are generated using the DYNAN program.

DynaPile
DynaPile was developed to compute the dynamic stiffness of single piles or pile groups. The piles can be either floating piles or end-bearing piles. Vertical, horizontal and rocking dynamic stiffnesses will be generated by the program. The program will also generate the group reduction factors for pile groups under small excitation conditions. The method of computation is based on the consistent boundary-matrix method proposed by Blaney, Kausel and Roesset (1976).
Pile foundations were analyzed for some time neglecting interaction effects betwwen the piles through the soil and enforcing only compatibility of displacements at their heads under the assumption of a rigid mat. The dynamic model, which takes into account the whole soil medium in the analysis, can conveniently provide information about group-reduction factors of pile foundations if the soil properties are adjusted to account for the effective level of strains.
Input parameters consist of the structural and dynamic properties of the pile, geometric configuration of the pile groups, soil properties, definition of excitation forces (in frequencies), and definition of superstructures masses.

DynaMat
The design of foundation for vibrating machines requires an accurate prediction of the foundation response. The method of analysis is complex because it involves the dimension and geometry of the machine foundation, the embedment effect, the material and radiation damping of soils, variation of soil properties with depth, and the interaction effect between the foundation and soils.
DynaMat uses a three dimensional hybrid method to estimate the equivalent dynamic stiffness and damping of machine foundations. Multiple soil layers can be specified and considered by the program.
The hybrid method contains finite elements that are employed in the near field in order to obtain a discrete solution. In the far field, a semidiscrete solution is synthesized from modes also calculated by the finite element method. The solutions are matched by applying the stationarity condition of a functional.
The finite element method is particularly attractive when dealing with problems involving complicated geometries and inhomogeneities. Thus it is widely used in soil-structure interaction studies. Finite elements are employed in the near field (neighborhood of the source of excitation or region of interest). However, because of the unboundedness of the soil region, the near field must be defined by introducing an artificial boundary. It is then necessary to apply conditions at this boundary in order to reproduce the effect of the far field (the complementary unbounded region).Ssince the objective in applying these conditions is to allow absortion or transmission of the waves impinging on the artificial boundaries, the conditions are referred to as absorbing or transmitting boundary conditions and the boundaries are known as absorbing or transmitting boundaries.
Input parameters consist of the dynamic properties of the layered soil, geometric configuration of the mat foundation, and definition of frequencies of analysis. The user specify the foundation with either circular or rectangular shape. The program will automatically generate the three dimensional finite element mesh for the analysis.

GeoMat
The program is aimed at the solution under static loading of two classes of problems encountered in structural engineering: a soil-supported mat or a soil-supported structural slab. The mat or structural slab is modeled with linear finite elements. The shape may be rectangular, round, or irregular and the thickness may vary.
For the soil-supported mat, the soil is assumed to have a linear response which is defined with the subgrade modulus and is characterized by a set of springs which can vary in stiffness at points under the mat. The springs can reflect horizontal as well as vertical resistances. The solution follows the classical Winkler model. This method of modeling soil has been widely used in the analysis of flexible beams and mats on elastic materials.

SETOFF
The computer program SETOFF analyzes foundation settlement of both, shallow and deep foundations, using commonly-accepted procedures. The total settlement of a foundation is generally composed of two parts, elastic and consolidation settlement. Elastic settlement occurs because of the pseudo-elastic nature of most soils and it occurs immediately on application of the foundation load. Consolidation settlement takes place as the pore space in the soil is reduced under the foundation loading and it may require a period of time to be fully developed. The elastic settlement may not be important because it takes place during construction as the structural loads are added. Because of this, some compensation for the elastic settlement may take place during construction. This does not mean, however, that elastic settlement should be overlooked.
For the above criteria, SETOFF computes the settlement under 100% consolidation (without elastic settlement that occurs during construction, which can be calculated by other programs like APILE and SHAFT), but will not provide the information for the percentage of consolidation versus time.

STABLPRO
STABL is a computer program written for the general solution of slope-stability problems using a two-dimensional limiting equilibrium method. The original program was developed by Ronald A. Siegel at Purdue University in 1975. STABL was placed on line for routine use in 1976 by the Indiana Department of Highways, and after being reported in the open literature, the program was adopted by many agencies.
The extensive use of STABL for academic purposes originated requests from users to introduce many improvements to the original STABL program since its introduction. Most of the current versions can handle tieback loading, reinforced-earth layers in embankment, and Spencer's method of analysis.STABL programs feature unique, random techniques for generation of potential failure surfaces and the most critical surface is shown in the output as the one with the lowest factor of safety.

PileGPw
PileGPw is an interactive software program developed to provide the distribution of load and computation of axial deformation of the piles within a pile group. This program is based on the elastic analyses provided by Randolph and Wroth (see references) for single piles and a pile group under axial loads only.
PileGPw can analyze regularly or variably spaced piles in any group configuration as long as locations can be described by a coordinate system. The piles may be of variable diameters; however, all piles in the analysis must be of the same length. This program can provide the distribution of loads within a group with a rigid cap and also the distribution of load within a group utilizing a flexible pile cap. Pile caps other than rigid can be modeled by introducing individual pile-head settlements. This feature allows the presentation of individual pile-load differences caused by a rigid pile cap.

GRLWEAP
Since its introduction in 1988, GRLWEAP (which is based on the WEAP program of 1976) has achieved wide popularity throughout the world. The program simulates the behavior of a pile (a slender elastic rod) and the surrounding soil (an elastic, plastic and viscous material) under the impact of a pile driving hammer. Powerful options combine the basic analysis of one hammer blow into the simulation of a complete pile driving process. Today the GRLWEAP software is recognized by many specifying agencies as the most reliable predictor of dynamic pile driving stresses, hammer performance, and either blow count or bearing capacity of an impact driven pile.

UTexas4
UTexas4 is a computer software application for computing the stability of earth and earth-rock slopes and embankments. UTEXAS4 has been written and is maintained by Dr. Stephen G. Wright of Shinoak Software, who is well-recognized as one of the leading experts in solving problems in soil strength and slope stability (Duncan and Wright, 2005).
UTexas4 has been considered one of the most sophisticated commercial software available to study the stability of slopes using a two-dimensional, limit-equilibrium method. The program has been widely used by the US Army Corps of Engineers and US Federal Highway Administration.
UTexas4 features unique random techniques for generation of potential failure surfaces for subsequent determination of the most critical surfaces and their corresponding factors of safety. The factor of safety is defined with respect to shear strength, i.e. the factor of safety is the ratio of the soil shear strength to the equilibrium shear stress. Values of the factor of safety at or less than unity are considered to represent instability and failure of the slope.

BorinGS
BorinGS, a computer program for drafting boring logs and well-completion logs, was developed by Gookin Software, LLC. From printing blank logs for field use to inputting field data to generating high-quality logs, BorinGS is easy to use, highly customizable, and requires little to no training.
Both US customary and SI (metric) units are supported; data may be entered in one system and printed in the other set of units. Entering subsurface information is easy using the formatted data entry screens. A built-in spell-checker in included, along with a customizable dictionary. Save multiple boring logs in one file and show up to seven laboratory data columns in each log. BorinGS also can handle dual-pipe well installations!
Output features include use of customizable boring templates, a feature to generate a key to borings with samplers and soil tyepes used on the log. Additional features include the ability to continue material descriptions across page breaks, a page-preview feature, high-quality printed output, batch printing of all borings logs in a file, the ability to print blank boring forms for use in the field, and output of pages to JPEG format for inclusion in reports.
Output features include use of customizable boring templates, a feature to generate a key to borings with samplers and soil tyepes used on the log. Additional features include the ability to continue material descriptions across page breaks, a page-preview feature, high-quality printed output, batch printing of all borings logs in a file, the ability to print blank boring forms for use in the field, and output of pages to JPEG format for inclusion in reports.

ATENA
Advanced Tool For Engineering Nonlinear Analysis
ATENA is a finite element based software designed specifically for the analysis of reinforced concrete. With ATENA users can simulate the actual behavior of concrete structures, including concrete cracking, crushing, and yielding of the reinforcement thereby producing a more accurate prediction of load carrying capacity. Additionally, ATENA provides a unique run-time environment, allowing users to see this behavior in real time, as the structure is being analyzed.

AMPS
The AMPS suite of programs was developed by AMPS Technology Company. The AMPS Package is a finite-element system that is composed of three modules:
AMPSolid : a mesh generator
AMPView : A pre-processing and post-processing finite-element application
AMPSol : a nonlinear finite-element solver
The programs are implemented to run on a personal computed, under all current Windows operating systems.

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